The Cast Iron Sukiyaki Pan with Handle

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The Cast Iron Sukiyaki Pan with Handle

Ideal for any sort of high-heat cooking, from seared steaks to fried eggs, this exquisite pan is both elegant and practical. Made in Japan in the traditional nambu tekki style — recognized for its distinctive character and quality — the cast iron only gets better with time.


$228
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Ideal for any sort of high-heat cooking, from seared steaks to fried eggs, this exquisite pan is both elegant and practical. Made in Japan in the traditional nambu tekki style — recognized for its distinctive character and quality — the cast iron only gets better with time.

Story

Both elegant and practical, this exquisite cast iron pan is made in Japan in the traditional nambu tekki style. A class of ironware that’s been produced since the 17th-century, nambu tekki is a highly respected art form valued for its distinctive character and quality — the traditional sukiyaki pan is one of the most popular designs. Sukiyaki is a type of Japanese hot pot, and while this pan is designed with it in mind, it’s also ideal for any sort of high-heat cooking, from steaks to seared fish to fried eggs. Like a crêpe pan or griddle, the short edges make handling food with a spatula breezy, while the thick, sturdy cast iron bottom and walls allow for excellent heat retention. Plus, it will become increasingly nonstick over time when treated with care — remember, cast iron loves fat, but hates water.

Specs
  • 8" Diameter
  • 7" Handle
Materials
  • Cast Iron
  • Pre-Seasoned With Proprietary Blend of Tea, Vinegar, Fruit Juices, and Raw Natural Lacquer
Origin
  • Made in Japan
Care
  • Season your new pan.
  • Clean by scrubbing with a dishwashing brush or tawashi before pouring out excess fat, and rinsing briefly with hot water.
  • Wipe dry using a clean rag before re-oiling if needed.
  • Cast iron loves fat and hates water, so scrubbing before rinsing is ideal to keep water contact minimal.
  • Never soak cast iron in water for extended periods of time.
  • Avoid using soap when cleaning cast iron — soap's oil cutting properties remove the natural fatty seal you're trying to build up.